Extensive Research Work Gives J Lyle Bootman Pause over New COVID-19 Treatment

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Jesse Lyle Bootman

The local pharmacy is the typical point of contact for those who need access to drugs and medication. This well-regulated institution exists to give the general public access to the health-promoting products they need while still putting medical experts in charge. A coronavirus vaccine, which remains in development in the U.S., will undoubtedly find its way into thousands of pharmacies across the country. The near-term future of vaccine development, public roll-out and how its eventually administered is of great interest to J Lyle Bootman. That’s because he spent decades in the pharmacy, medicine and public health sector. His current role at a data-oriented global health firm also translates to the grand scale of distribution as it pertains to future coronavirus vaccines.

According to an Aug. 23, 2020 article from USA Today, the announcement of “a potential COVID-19 vaccine” could mean “infusions of antibody-rich plasma from recovered patients” that can “aid the immune systems of the sick.” Additional news reports reveal that 70,000 people have already been given the convalescent plasma and this form of treatment has been under investigation since March. Adding further complication is that the supply is currently limited so despite the welcome good news, it’s not yet the “cure” we’ve been waiting for since early 2020. Mr. Bootman’s previous role as co-chair of The Institute of Medicine, which published “Preventing Medication Errors” during his tenure, shows his commitment to smart and effective medicine administered by professionals at a pharmacy. While the effectiveness of this new plasma method is far from proven, it comes at a critical time. More than 5.7 million Americans have tested positive for the coronavirus and 176,000 citizens have died because of it.

Because of Jesse Lyle Bootman’s own lengthy career in this sector, and hundreds of personal research projects to his name, he’s a staunch supporter of doing your homework. His work into drug-related problems among elderly patients has renewed relevance here, as COVID-19 infections have largely proved deadly to those in their 70s and up. J Lyle Bootman’s work as co-investigator and principal investigator on this topic was conducted on behalf of The University of Arizona. The school is also where he was a faculty member of 40 years, including time as dean of the college of pharmacy. Even his current role, where Mr. Bootman helps to reduce medication-related problems, is relevant to possible coronavirus treatment plans. The goal of every medical professional is to spot any safety, efficacy and cost concerns before patients even enter the picture.

J Lyle Bootman
J Lyle Bootman writes about the pharmaceutical industry.

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